pentype-a
rtf-n:

I’ve been thinking about how to train myself to become better a temporal dead reckoner.  I want to build a more accurate sense of time.  The goal for now is to sense of 3 mins precisely.  Could I train myself to know what 3 minutes feels like?  I feel like I could if I try hard enough.
So to help me get there, I’m building an app. Here’s a wireframe for an app to test and train temporal dead reckoning. I use the volume buttons as input, so you don’t have to be looking at the screen to know where to press.  The graph tracks each attempt. After 10 successful attempts (getting within 10% of the goal) you move to the next level.  
The app starts at 1 second (level 1). Press the volume button to start the stopwatch. The numbers scramble randomly and at random intervals (so you can use it a measure).  Press the button again to stop as close to 1 second as you can.  Land within 0.1 second of 1 second ten times consecutively and move to the next level of difficulty (2 seconds)….and so on.  How far could I get?
Of course if I do it staring at a clock, I’d only be cheating myself. This isn’t a competition.  It’s an experiment.  Can I teach my brain to tune my subjective sense of time through a simple timing exercise.
Drummers would probably be really good at this.  Maybe monks would be good at sensing long increments times. I think it would be amazing and beautiful to have such an accurate and precise sense of time that you could close your eyes, meditate, and open them an hour later knowing exactly an hour had passed.
I think most of us value a good sense of spacial orientation, distances, and hold some kind of mental map of our surroundings.  So, why not a mental map of our position in time?
Getting lost in time is easy. Read a book, watch a good movie, play a video game, get immersed in pretty much any intense activity and time will fly. We can also slow it down by boring ourselves, doing some repetitive task or getting locked up in solitary confinement.  But what about being in perfect sync with time?

rtf-n:

I’ve been thinking about how to train myself to become better a temporal dead reckoner.  I want to build a more accurate sense of time.  The goal for now is to sense of 3 mins precisely.  Could I train myself to know what 3 minutes feels like?  I feel like I could if I try hard enough.

So to help me get there, I’m building an app. Here’s a wireframe for an app to test and train temporal dead reckoning. I use the volume buttons as input, so you don’t have to be looking at the screen to know where to press.  The graph tracks each attempt. After 10 successful attempts (getting within 10% of the goal) you move to the next level.  

The app starts at 1 second (level 1). Press the volume button to start the stopwatch. The numbers scramble randomly and at random intervals (so you can use it a measure).  Press the button again to stop as close to 1 second as you can.  Land within 0.1 second of 1 second ten times consecutively and move to the next level of difficulty (2 seconds)….and so on.  How far could I get?

Of course if I do it staring at a clock, I’d only be cheating myself. This isn’t a competition.  It’s an experiment.  Can I teach my brain to tune my subjective sense of time through a simple timing exercise.

Drummers would probably be really good at this.  Maybe monks would be good at sensing long increments times. I think it would be amazing and beautiful to have such an accurate and precise sense of time that you could close your eyes, meditate, and open them an hour later knowing exactly an hour had passed.

I think most of us value a good sense of spacial orientation, distances, and hold some kind of mental map of our surroundings.  So, why not a mental map of our position in time?

Getting lost in time is easy. Read a book, watch a good movie, play a video game, get immersed in pretty much any intense activity and time will fly. We can also slow it down by boring ourselves, doing some repetitive task or getting locked up in solitary confinement.  But what about being in perfect sync with time?

kennahcat

adreianpayne:

cindimayweathersson:

trickpapi:

Here’s a list of some of the people working in the Ferguson Police Department with pictures along with their work numbers and emails which I’ll list below.

tjackson@fergusoncity.com
rhenke@fergusoncity.com
dmcbride@fergusoncity.com
ddecarli@fergusoncity.com
rnabzdyk@fergusoncity.com
tzoll@fergusoncity.com

PD email is police@fergusoncity.com

Please reblog.

The fact that not all of them have pictures is a give away for how messy this police department is.

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